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from the group: Screen Plate

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Pre-photographic

Photomechanical

Photographic

Albumen
Ambrotype
Bromoil
Bromoil Transfer
Carbon
Carbro
Chromogenic
Collodion POP
Cyanotype
Daguerreotype
Direct Carbon (Fresson)
Dye Imbibition
Gelatin Dry Plate
Gelatin POP
Gum Dichromate
Instant (Diffusion Transfer)
Instant (Dye Diffusion Transfer)
Instant (Internal Dye Diffusion Transfer)
Matte Collodion
Platinum
Salted Paper
Screen Plate
Silver Dye Bleach
Silver Gelatin DOP
Tintype
Wet Plate Collodion

Digital

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Notes on this view:

The Joly screen plate process was the first screen plate commercially introduced. Patented in 1894 and introduced in 1895 by Irish physicist John Joly, the process is based on a theory published in 1869 by Louis Ducos du Hauron. Ducos du Hauron's theory proposed that a full-color image could be produced if a screen made up of additive colored stripes was placed in front of a light sensitive emulsion. The screen would allow only the light corresponding to the colors of the scene to transmit to the emulsion, while absorbing the rest.

The Joly process was a "separate system," meaning the color screen is separate from the image bearing plate. It also had separate taking screen and viewing screens. Both screens had an identical pattern of additive color lines on a glass plate, but had slightly different sets of colors. The taking screen had lighter colors to allow for shorter exposure times while the viewing screen had more saturated colored dyes to make the color image appear more vibrant. The taking screen was placed in the camera plate holder in front of a gelatin dry plate where the light would first pass through the screen before striking the plate.